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, you heard what senator feinstein said about granting clemency to edward snowden and bringing him back to help investigate the national security agency. >> well, the only investigation here is to what extent he knew about the material that he stole and who else he worked with. certainly the russians are not allowing him to stay in the country of russia because they think he's just a nice guy there. is clearly more to this story. i think that is a -- if he wants to come back and open up to the responsibility of the fact that he took and stole information, he violated his oath, he disclosed classified information, that by the way has allowed three different terrorist organization, affiliates of al qaeda to change the way they communicate, i'd be happy to have that discussion with him. but he does need to own up with what he's done. if he wants to talk through why he did it those things that would be the appropriate time and the appropriate way to do it. >> schieffer: you would not be willing to give him any kind of clemency, i take it? >> no. i don't see any reason. i wouldn't do that
what we see is that the potential risk to the united states of leakers like edward snowden changes the calculus of who we conduct intelligence against. i don't think there should be any principled reason not to spy on allies, but you have to take into account the risk it's going to be disclosed and that can be harmful. it underlines the extent of edward snowden's treason that all of this is out in public. our intelligence gathering has been damaged in ways we can hardly talk about. >> you talk about both sides, conservatives and republicans, are commenting about this. let's read two examples of that. one is from investors, business daily, they have an editorial. we seem to be going out of way to alienate friends and allies in recent months. they all have found to varying degrees an unreliable partner in the united states under president obama. they're conservative. let's look at what's in the "new york times" this morning. i've seen an america that was respected, hated, feared, and loved, but i was confronted repeatedly with an attitude toward america that i've never heard before.
justified in spilling intelligence secrets. the german lawmaker who met edward snowden said the confessed leaker wants to testify in front of congress. >> he stressed that he is ready to come before the german parliament to testify and that he would rather go before the pairliment and put the facts on the table. >> she says he is making his own decisions and is not being manipulated by the russians. >> despite the police state surveillance state we have been turning into. i think he would love to come back some day if the conditions plitly were different. >> nsa chief alexander, the turmoil now giving him second thoughts on whether spying on al lies like german chancellor merkel was worth it. >> i think those partnerships have greater value than some of the collection and we ought to look at it like that. >> the intelligence community denies collecting reports from citizens calling reports from sn snowden completely false. but secretary of state acknowledging that they went too far. >> our president is determined to clarify and do the review in order that nobody will have a sense of abuse
accordingand yahoo! to edward snowden. new job.und a general alexander said he will be illegal for the nsa to break in to any new bases but what if they tap into [inaudible] cable? is do we have a rogue agency in our hands are not? this goes back to our previous discussion of who is minding the store. we have the director of national knowligence, what does he and when did he know it and when did they tell the president they are instructing on foreign readers? or tell't he tell them the president about the scope of the nsa activity if the director of intelligence new about this. the commander- in-chief in the dark on things like this. you cannot do it. >> there is a long traditional of possible denial. time, tremendous pressure to provide goodies. presidents complaint i have -- there's nothing in here that i have not already read in "the new york times." where are you going to get the special goodies? are are showing they meaningful. >> the president said we would not listen in. would you listen in on angela merkel? president -- >> they are not listening to her conversations. ata thatrt of
to talk directly to the former u.s. intelligence operative edward snowden about the nsa's spying activities. >> if the message is that mr. snowden wants to provide us with information and tell us something, then we will gladly accept that. because any clarification, information, and fax we can obtain is a good thing -- and facts we can obtain is a good thing. >> the announcement came after a politician returned from russia with a letter from snowden, offering to give sworn testimony on u.s. spying activities directed at german citizens and leaders. he held a surprise three-hour meeting with snowden in russia on thursday night. snowden reportedly offered to give testimony in germany, but his lawyer said a meeting could only take race and russia -- take place in russia for legal reasons. snowden would have a lot to say to the german people. >> also on friday, germany became the first european country to allow a third gender option for newborn babies. under the new law, babies born with characteristics of both sexes will no longer have to be registered as male or female. many inters
contractor, edward snowden. >> the national security agency took the unusual step thursday of denying a report that'ves drop on the vatican phone calls and may have tapped in on pope francis before he was elected. what are you making up? is this a church, state issue? >> you got in on the consistent, the ones that depict the new pope, john? >> who knows. saved a lot of money. those guys have not done anything that was not known to the national security council and the white house and the idea of blaming these guys who are doing the job they were signed to do and oh my goodness, for miss feinstein, that there's a touch of hypocrisy here. >> there's a lot of outrage. i'm with clapper on this issue as well. i mean, i think because of the technological advances and the fact that we can now, you know, look in on people's cell phones, that you know, there has to be some more guidelines brought into this thing. but overall, friends spy on friends, it's not going to stop. >> what do you think of that? >> i think, well, i'm not enough people, clearly. there's no doubt that this has been g
national security agency contractor, edward snowden, one former aide to the chancellor said that snowden has done the western world a great service and it's up to us to help him. today on "face the nation," rejecting the idea that snowden be granted any clemency. >> can he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country and i think the answer is no clemency. >> a republican counterpart in the house also dismissed the idea. >> no, i don't see any reason. you know, we -- i wouldn't do that. >> the suspect in friday's fatal shooting of a tchl sa altsa age has been charged with murder. paul ciancia wrote a note indicating that he intended to die during the attack. he survived after being wounded by the police. >>> four prominent scientists, including james hansen, distributed a joint letter citing the need for nuclear power plants. they wrote renewables like wind and solar and biomass cannot scale up fast enoug
edward snowden. also the best and worst places in the world to grow old. we'll take a look at where seniors are struggling - ahead. ed d . >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with the headlines tonight. charges have been filed against a suspect in the lax shooting that killed a t.s.a. officer. if convicted 23-year-old paul ciancia could face the death penalty. authorities say he left a note at the scene. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. in the employe employees, addressing them staying that he want to instill fear in their minds. >> healthcare.gov is down for maintenance - the website used to enrol in the insurance program and will be offline until 9am sunday morning. pakistan's wanted man was buried. taliban chief hakimullah mehsud was killed by a u.s. drone yesterday. supporters have threatened suicide bombings in revenge. hakimullah mehsud's death has pakistani politicians concerned about the future of peace talks with the taliban. we have more from peshawar. >> this is seen as a blow to the taliban pakistan, which may have a struggle
about -- tell us about this drawing that was leaked alodge with some other edward snowden documents. does it show how the nsa broke into google. >> >> yes, think of google as having multiple data centers around the world. what apparently, it did, the fiberoptic connections, they tabbed into. they put a clip on or had a way to monitor what was going through those fiberoptic cables. that's something we've learned from snowden that they've been doing around the world. but it's particularly disturbing that it's done with google. google is unique. it's the only entim tientity in that has a mission to collect all the world's snfgs. remember, the nsa is only collecting information about people that they think are a threat to the united states and others. >> so, scott, some of the biggest names in high-tech are now working with the obama administrati administration what does this say about the government's handle on tech nothing. >> i think it was obviously a black eye. something this big should have been rolled out with a lot more test iing. anybody that's in the business knows that you do
controversy continues to spread. in the wakeover it, edward snowden has had a meeting with a german legislator the, present that person with a letter, speaking the truth is not a crime, i am confident that with the support of the international community the government of united states will abandon this harmful practice. he's seeking some kind of clemency. are there any conditions under which president obama would consider clemency? >> none that have been discussed. >> none at all? >> none. >> it's not on the table? >> it's not been on the table. mr. snowden violated u.s. law. our belief has always been that he should return to the united states and face justice. >> finally, rand paul is our next guest, senator rand paul, do you agree with jay carney your white house colleague, that it would be awesome if rand paul ran for president in 2016? >> i suspect that the the 2016 republican nomination is going to be awesome no matter who runs. >> okay, dan pfeiffer, thanks very much. >>> let's go to senator rand paul right there. you heard dan pfeiffer say it's going to be an awesome race. are you goin
this comes after documents from edward snowden suggested that the us had been bugging chancellor uncle and eccles phone. the german politician hans christian spread that met snowing in moscow this week to ask him about the claims. threadless has snowed was willing to help the german government investigate. police in california has begun an investigation into the shooting at los angeles airport. they killed a security officer and disrupted more than seven hundred flights across the united states the alleged shooter and twenty three year old man stormed into one of the terminals friday morning killing the officer and injuring at least two other people. police shot and injured him before taking him into custody officials said he had some one hundred rounds of ammunition brock is back in the headlines and sectarian violence there has claimed the lives of seven thousand people this year alone. is the most vile as the country's seen since two thousand eight. below is struggling to push back a resurgent al qaeda. prime minister nuri al will be keen on a visit to washington has called for more
on and on and on. one assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and suprt the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and beli
whistle blowers. the more edward snowden can have a normalized and free life, the more it will let other whistle blowers come forward. >> again, if you ever want that platform, cash in is waiting, ready, willing and able to hear what you're ready to break. >> thanks, eric. >>> coming up, how the health care website being temporarily down can lift america back up for good. i'll explain. as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! what's in your wallet? help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've
the leaker. >> edward snowden being the leaker. we were talking about domestic spying and snooping on americans. here you have purely foreign intelligence and suddenly that's a crime as well. it's kind of an indication of the moving goalpost. >> domestically the political back lash. there are -- >> against the nsa -- >> there's sensenbrenner in the house -- >> especially when there's legislation to stop the nsa from data collection, let the aclu basically argue why certain things shouldn't be done. and to really handcuff our intelligence services the way that it happened in the 1970s, which indirectly led up to our failures that led to 9/11. >> how big a danger is that, mary? >> well, it's, i think it's possible that, you know, you're going to get some momentum. but it's incredibly naive. i mean, you know, is this -- if the u.s. stops doing this, then it woen be happening anymore. basically if the u.s. stops doing it then the only ones doing it will be the chinese, the russians, you know, the brazilians, the cubans. and probably the germans and the french. you know, the idea that b
to "press:here." recent articles in "the guardian" quoting information provided by edward snowden indicate the national security agency has done what many people thought could not be done. the nsa has cracked the powerful encryption which protects bank transfers and medical records and trade secrets as they travel through cyberspace. "the new york times" says the nsa treats its recent successes in deciphering protected information as among its most closely guarded secrets which is why then nsa won't talk to us about kriping to ra if i but martin has been arguing with and working with the nsa since 1975. thank you for being with us this morning. let me ask, and i understand you have no special way of peeking inside the nsa. these encryption standards, i always heard it would take 100 computers 100 years to break the sort of encryption standards we use today. am i wrong? >> it's complicated. the basic standard known as the advanced encryption standard, it would take millions of computers millions of years to break, but it's how you implement it. it's like if you have a resettable combinatio
and question edward snowden. germany wants to know how extensive the spying of the national security agency was. and berlin officials want snowden to show him the original documents that he has leaked. >>> in his weekly address, president obama talked about the need to pass a budget that includes spending on education and research. he said a budget shouldn't be cut just for the sake of cutting. >> remember our deficits are getting smaller, not bigger. on my watch they are falling at the fastest pace in 60 years. that gives us room to fix our long term debt problems without sticking it to young people or undermining our bedrock retirement and health security programs. >> house and senate budget negotiators want to divert a new round of cuts. >>> if you want to go online to check on the affordable health care plans tonight you're out of luck. the health insurance website is off line until tomorrow morning. a technology team will be working on >>> there is no reason for wine lovers to panic. there were 300 million cases last year. down 5% from the year before. it's the lowest level since the 1960s
they would love to go to russia to question edward snowden. germany wants to know exactly how extensive the spying of the national security agency was. berlin officials also want snowden to show them the original documents the former nsa analysts has leaked. records show the u.s. has spied on leaders of 35 countries, including german's chancellor, angela merkel. >> one of the original mercury 7 astronauts has been laid to rest. scott carpenter, seen here on the far left, died from complications of a stroke. he was 88. john glenn, another mercury astronaut, was among the mourners yesterday. he was the second american to orbit the earth, and later had a successful career as an aquanaut. >>> much has been written about the new subsidized insurance rates under obamacare. but equally important is the free care that's now available to many more people under med e cal, the state's version of medicaid. michael finney tells us what it takes to qualify. >> nora is get hearing blood sugar level checked. this preventative care is something she might not have done in the past. >> i couldn't afford i
to question edward snowden. they would like to know exactly how extensive the spying of the national agency was. berlin officials also want snowden to show them the original documents the former nsa analysts has leaked. records show the u.s. has speed -- spied on leader of 35 countries, including german's chancellor, angela merkel. >> one of the original mercury astronaughts has been laid to rest. mr. carpenter was 88 years old. john glenn, another mercury astronaut, was among the mourners yesterday. he was the second american to orbit the earth and later had a successful career as an aquanaut. >>> much has been written about the new subsidized insurance rates under the affordable care act but equally important is the insurance that's available to many under this program. michael finney tells us what it takes to qualify. >> nora is get hearing blood sugar level checked. this preventative care is something she might not have done in the past. >> i couldn't afford it. this is really, you know, caused a lot of problems in the family because it's not only me, it's my family, my husband, my kids
the finish line in central park. >>> german officials say they would love to go to russia to question edward snowden. they would like to know exactly how extensive the spying of the national agency was. berlin officials also want snowden to show them the original document the former nsa analysts has leaked. records show the u.s. has speed on leaders of 35 countries, including german's chancellor, angela merkel. >>> one of the original astronauts has been laid to rest, mr. car penaltyter was 88. john glenn, you see there, another mercury 7 members, was among the mourners yesterday. he was the second american to orbit the earth and later had a successful career as an aquanaut. >>> much has been written about the new subsidized ratesnd the affordable care act but equally important is the insurance that's available to many under this program. michael finney tells us what it takes to qualify. >> she is get hearing blood sugar level checked. this preventative care is something she might not have done in the past. >> i couldn't afford it. it caused a lot of problems in the family because not only m
an end to secrecy. first you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has caused and international -- an international uproar. it makes you wonder whether the government can preserve some of the secrets because there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. we could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government needs to do and our own freedom and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guaranteed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? guest: you have to ask him, i think he is a little bit of both. host: why do you say that? guest: he made no secret that he has a point of view. that means
assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and support the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and believe
there are people out there who think that glenn greenwald and edward snowden should be locked up if not hung. there is a lot of passion around this subject. i think that on the whole, greenwald as journalist and snowden as the leaker have forced us to face to have a debate that is long overdue. and to deal with the fact that there is inadequate accountability for the kind of information gathering that goes on in our intelligence community. i think sometimes people like glen greenwald or julian assange bring us brokers of information for one reason or another wouldn't get and they serve a purpose by goting us when we slack and we do. newspapers are put out by human beings and human beings make mistakes. i think, yes, there is uneasy and sometimes contentious but we co-exist and sometim-- >> we'll put a link up on cnn's "reliable sources" website. bill keller, thank you for coming in today and joining us. >> next, my conversation with glenn greenwald on why he thinks bill keller and "the new york times" had formula for journalism exactly backward. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
and what edward snowden has done? >> guest: um, i believe in whistleblowers. i mean, i do think that whistleblowers perform a public service, especially when there's corruption in government or pharmaceuticals or harming people and they step forward. i'm mixed on snowden. i am mixed. i do believe that there's certain secrets that you have to keep for the security of our country, and perhaps i've changed a little bit on that since 9/11. but i don't know quite what to make on the snowden thing. parts of it, parts of his disclosures i think have gotten us into a national debate and conversation that's constructive and good. and i don't know about the rest. i'm sorry to -- i'm not copping out, i just simply haven't come down hard on one side or the other. >> host: about 30 minutes left in our interview with kitty kelley, this month's "in depth" guest on booktv. phil in north hollywood, california, good afternoon. >> caller: hi there, peter. really love your show. i always get some new insight from writers that i've known or just discovered. ms. kelley, just curious to know with all
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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